Tag Archives: Garlic

Korean-inspired Sweet & Spicy Wings

Posted on by .

Korean-inspired Sweet & Spicy wings

I don’t know how many of you have tried Korean spicy chicken wings prior to having to eat gluten free, I only did once.  And they were delicious, sticky, spicy and oh-so-good! My husband often picks up a pack when we are at the Korean grocer for munching.  I don’t make them at home – usually – because not only are they tossed in seasoned flour (not GF, but easily converted) but they are deep-fried.

Now that is a mess I don’t like.  I like fried food as much as the next person but man, I hate that mess if prepared at home.

The other thing I don’t think I’ve ever gotten 100% right was the seasoning.  That sticky red-spicy and sweet sauce that coats the wings seems to also differ rather significantly depending on who is making it.  Since his favorite Korean chicken place closed a long while back (16 months +?), I know he’s been craving these wings.  And quite honestly, I wanted some sticky goodness too. :D

This time around, I rinsed the pack of wings, patted them dry, seasoned them (salt, pepper & granulated garlic) and put them in the oven at a very high heat (450F+).  I flipped them a bit more than half way through cooking (25 minutes?) and broiled them for another 8-10 minutes until they were crispy brown.  Frying averted.

The only thing that remained was making the spicy-sweet sauce to coat them in. (I made it while they baked.)  Most of the recipes given to me over time contain “mulyeot” which is a malted corn syrup.  Since it is traditionally made with barley but now seems that most are making it with corn, I avoid it.  I don’t know enough about the processing, preparation, etc and the words “barley” and “malt” are all I need to know sometimes.  I substituted corn syrup (in the recipe below) but next time will also add some brown sugar to caramelize this even more.

If you are looking for a sweet & spicy wing recipe, this might be for you too!

Korean-inspired Spicy & Sweet Wing Sauce

Makes enough for 12-15 full chicken wings  (4 pounds+?)

Ingredients:

2 Tablespoons gluten free soy sauce
1 Tablespoon corn syrup (or honey)
1 1/2 Tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 Tablespoons mirin or other rice wine
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
2 teaspoons minced ginger
1 teaspoons Korean red chili powder (less/more to taste)
2 teaspoons minced jalapeño (seeded!  Or not – if you want it to be HOT HOT HOT!)
3 Tablespoons water (or 1 1/2 Tablespoons ginger juice* + 1 1/2 Tablespoons water)

Directions:

  1. Mix together GF soy sauce, corn syrup (or honey), sugar, mirin, garlic, ginger, chili powder and 3 Tablespoons water.  (Reserve jalapeños – if you want to keep their color bright. If it doesn’t matter to you, toss them in now.)
  2. Taste!  (no kidding!  Dip your finger in and taste this mix.  Is it sweet enough?  It will get a bit spicier as you let it blend together, but if it is not spicy enough or you doubt that it will be, add some more jalapeño or chili powder.)
  3. Bring it to a boil then lower the heat.  Allow mixture to simmer – stirring frequently – until it has reduced by almost half.  It will thickly coat the back of a metal spoon when dipped and removed from the mixture.  (If time is running out – or you don’t think it is as thick as you’d like, you can speed up the thickening (but diminish the flavor intensity a bit) by mixing together 1 teaspoon cornstarch (not flour) and 2 teaspoons of water.  Add this to the simmering sauce at the end and stir constantly.  The sauce will thicken over heat with this mixture, so watch that you don’t over thicken it as well.)
  4. Pour the sauce into a large bowl when done.  Add a few wings at a time and stir to coat the wings well.  Remove and place on a serving dish.  Continue until all wings are coated. (Sometimes we even save some of the sauce before dipping the wings in for dipping while eating – just an option.)

Happy GF Eating!
Kate

 

Gluten Free Tamale Pie – on the grill

Posted on by .

Gluten Free "Tamale Pie"

It is not nearly as hot here in the Pacific Northwest as it is where my family is (Chicago & Minnesota).  You guys have certainly had the heat wave.    We are still wearing our October gear in the mornings.  However, yesterday it was 85F.  (I know, still not hot comparatively, but come on… that’s a 20 degree jump for us!)

We took full advantage of the day:  playground in the morning, walk after lunch, bubbles/sidewalk chalk, building a fort, soccer outside, etc.  By the time dinner-cooking-hour rolled around, I was hot.  And so was the house.  We don’t have air conditioning and the warmest time of day here is late afternoon.

At 3:30PM, the house was almost 80F.  The thought of heating up the house further to cook (as the temperature was still rising) was NOT appealing to me at all.  I had planned to make a tamale pie with whatever veggies + ground beef that were in the fridge.  I knew this meant browning the beef, sauteing veggies and what not on the stove top and then finishing in the oven.  Oh.  NO.  Wasn’t happening.

So I cracked out the cast iron skillet and headed outside to the grill.  Beyond making the tamale dough topping, the rest of this was prepared on the grill.  I honestly didn’t plan to give a “recipe” today.  I totally winged this – but I think some of you might find the idea functional for you HOT house as well.

Forgive the lack of perfect measurements, I didn’t measure anything – so they are all guesstimates.

Nice, huh?  What a food blogger am I.

Oh well.  Here goes nothing!

Gluten free tamale pie - before "baking" it on the grill

 

You can see my fancy topping here – precooked.  Lovely, huh?

Tamale Pie on the Grill

NOTE:  Make sure you have enough gas (if using a gas grill) to have your burners on for 30-40 minutes on medium-high (or enough to maintain an internal temperature of 350F +)

TAMALE TOPPING (Prepare inside with you mixer)

Ingredients:
1 1/ cups masa harina, rehydrated according to package instructions
1/3 cup of butter, cut into pats
1/2 cup chicken broth (or water + gluten free chicken bouillon) or MORE
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
granulated garlic to taste (1/2-1 1/2 teaspoons)

Directions:

Put your rehydrated masa dough into the mixer.  Add the chicken broth, baking powder, salt, some granulated garlic and half of your butter pats.  Mix thoroughly on low.  Increase speed to medium after broth has been well incorporated.  Add the remaining pats of butter until well incorporated.  Beat on medium.  The dough texture should be coming up the sides of your mixer and not dense on the bottom or in a ball.  It is not super light – but should be very pliable.  If not, add a bit more broth – tablespoon by tablespoon – until your get rid of the ball stage.  Set aside.

TAMALE PIE – Meat + veggie bottom

Ingredients:

1 pound ground meat of choice (I used beef)
1/2 cup minced onion
4 carrots, peeled and diced
1/2 red bell pepper, diced
1/2 green bell pepper, diced
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 small can green chilis
2 whole tomatoes, diced
2/3 cup (or more??) frozen corn kernels (or fresh, if you’ve got them!)
1 Tablespoon + cumin
2 teaspoons ancho chili powder
salt/pepper to season to taste

Directions:  (written for those cooking on a gas grill)

  1. Put your cast iron skillet on your preheated grill.  Heat thoroughly.  Add a tablespoon of olive oil.
  2. Dump in diced hard veggies (onions, carrots).  Cook for 2-3 minutes.  Add diced peppers and tomato.  Cook again another 3-4 minutes.  Add garlic – cook until aromatic (1 – 2 minutes)
  3. Add ground meat.  Brown.
  4. Taste.  Add green chilis, frozen corn, cumin, chili powder and salt/pepper.
  5. Bring to a simmer.  Taste again.  Adjust seasoning to desired.  (NOTE:  If it is mild now, it will be SUPER mild later – so really taste/adjust now.)
  6. Once you’ve reached your flavor, top with the reserved tamale dough.  (I used my fingers to make a flat piece (much like working with play-dough) about 1/3-1/2 inch thick.  Cover the pan to the best of your ability.  I purposefully leave the edges open to allow me to see/check the base and the topping.
  7. Put your cast iron skillet on the “cool side” but still over some heat.  Our grill has 4 burners.  I turned the right two burners to high and the far left one to the off position.  The second one I had on medium.

GRILL BURNERS
ONE (off)           TWO (medium)           THREE (high)           FOUR (high)
Position pan over burner #2

8.”Bake” with your grill closed until the tamale pie topping is cooked through (about 30 minutes or more, depending on the temperature of your grill/outside).  You can check the dough by poking it (I know… but hey – I was only cooking for me).  If the center is dry/cakey/tamale like, you are good.  If there are any wet/doughy parts, keep it on the grill longer.

Serve with:  cucumber, avocado, shredded lettuce, sour cream, salsa, shredded cheese, fresh diced tomatoes, black olives, whatever….

GRILL BURNERS
ONE (off)           TWO (medium)           THREE (high)           FOUR (high)
Position pan over burner #2

Gluten Free "Tamale Pie" - made on the grill!

 

Creamy Brown Rice Risotto

Posted on by .

Risotto.  It’s one of the dishes I first ate after being diagnosed with Celiac.  I know for some of you the idea of NOT knowing what risotto is a little stupefying, but it’s true.  It’s not really a daily menu deal in my upbringing in Minnesota (or at least it wasn’t back-in-the-day).

Since my diagnosis came just a month before our wedding and two months before our honeymoon to Rome, my Love and I were doing a little food “research” about naturally gluten free foods because the store-bought ones we were finding were….well…disgusting.

Having grown up in Chicago, my Love was much more familiar with diverse food offerings than I.  When I told him that I’d read that risotto would be easy to find on our honeymoon and that I wondered if I would like it, he chuckled.  He said that I would LOVE it and was surprised I hadn’t eaten it before.

Needless to say, we made it a mission that week to make risotto.  He made the most divine seafood risotto for me.  I had plenty for leftovers and made many a colleague jealous with my lunch the next day.  It left a serious food-memory on my taste buds.

And the slow cooking – the standing together in the kitchen and slowly stirring and stirring the risotto made for perfect time together too.  It was rather fun to stand and stir and wonder what it would end up tasting like after all that.  It was totally worth it.

But these days, my risottos are less creamy.  Mostly because I’m not standing there stirring it as much as we used to because I’m running after someone, or someone is pulling up to “help” or… well, any number of things, really.  And really, the creaminess of risotto depends heavily of two things:  (1) constant slow stirring with warm broth added regularly in small amounts and (2) the starch of the aborio/risotto rice.
Garlic Scapes

When these fabulously curly garlic scapes showed up in our CSA box last week, I had NO idea what to do with them.  The gal at the farm stand told me to saute them in butter with a bit of salt.  But I thought surely there must be something more I could do, right?

Since I have enjoyed adding fiddlehead fern to our risotto or even green beans, these garlic scapes looked like they would make handsome risotto fixings.  They have a bit of a seriously garlic sting/bite when eaten raw (I’m a taster before I cook things).  I thought the flavor would be lovely when mellowed a bit.  So I liked the idea of saute until soft/tender.  But after that, my plans went awry.

No aborio rice on hand.

Say what?  How did I do that!  It seems that the last time I picked up a bag of short grain rice I did a fabulous job.  I have short grain rice, alright, but it is brown rice.  Not so fabulously known for its starchiness.  Nor its risotto fixings.

I had to make do.  I’m not running out for rice when we have rice in the house even though it isn’t the same grain.  And besides brown rice is healthier for you as it has the whole grain and has not been stripped of the bran – or outer layer.  And you know what?  With a few cooking adjustments to my risotto recipe, it made a great risotto!

GF:  Creamy Brown Rice Risotto with Garlic Scapes and Ginger
First things first, I made this with SHORT GRAIN brown rice that I did NOT prewash in order to keep the starch.  There *IS* a difference with the starchiness of the different grains of rice.  If you have long grain brown rice on hand, your risotto may not turn out as creamy as the grains will not stick together.  You can still make a risotto out of your long grain brown rice, but you will need to consider adding a bit of water + starch (I would add 2 Tablespoons of cold water + 2 teaspoons of cornstarch (not flour) premixed) at the end of cooking to thicken it a bit.

Second:  be sure to have precooked your brown rice – as outlined below – since brown rice takes MUCH longer to cook than white rice.

Third:  add whatever you’d like to your risotto.  The basic recipe is outlined below, but in lieu of garlic scapes, include your own veg or seafood, etc.  You really can’t go wrong.  (PS.  If using seafood, be sure to add it only at the end – it will cook quickly in the hot rice and overcooked seafood?  Not so fabulous.)

Creamy Brown Rice Risotto with Garlic Scapes
Ingredients:
1 1/4 cups short grain brown rice
3 cups of water
1/4 pound garlic scapes, halved and chopped into 1 inch pieces
5 green scallions, chopped
1-2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 cup thinly sliced sweet onion
1/2-inch knob of fresh ginger, finely diced
2 1/2 cups GF chicken (or veg) broth
1/2 cup grated or shredded cheese (parmesan, etc – I used sun-dried tomato + basil cheese)
garlic powder, salt and pepper – to taste

Directions:

  1. Put the rice into a pot with the three cups of water.  Bring to a boil and then turn down to a simmer.  Simmer for 16-18 minutes or until the majority of the water is absorbed and the rice is tender.  Drain in a strainer over a bowl.  (You may wish to use the reserved liquid to thicken your risotto – your choice, thus reserving.)
  2. Saute your vegetables (garlic scapes, in this case) until tender.  This took quite a bit of time with the garlic scapes as they are quite hardy.  However, it is important that they are tender as they won’t cook the same in the risotto.
  3. In a hot large pan (I used a two-inch deep, 10 inch wide pan), drizzle your olive oil.  Allow to heat for a bit, then put in the thinly sliced onion and ginger.  (If your love is like mine, you can carmelize your onion for added flavor too.). Cook until tender (or carmelized)
  4. Add the precooked rice, garlic scapes and 1 cup of the broth.  Stir until the broth is absorbed and stirring the rice allows you to “see the pan” without the rice covering up your spoon tracks quickly/liquid like.  Add another 1/2 cup of broth and continue stirring until you once again see the pan easily.  Continue this adding/stirring until you have used all of the broth.
  5. After the last addition of broth, season your risotto with garlic, salt and pepper.  Taste!  (This is important!)  Adjust the seasoning (and or the consistency by adding more broth) now.  Depending on your rice, you may need more broth than what I used.  This is natural.
  6. Add the shredded cheese and stir in.  Taste again.
  7. Serve hot with the scallions sprinkled over the top.
Happy GF Eating, All!
~Kate