Tag Archives: Recipe

Gluten Free Pull-Aparts: Garlic & Parmesan or Pizza Pull Aparts

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Gluten Free pull-apart Garlic Bread

I have a confession to make.  I’m addicted to Pinterest.  I haven’t started a Gluten Free Board – YET! – because I know once I do, it will just all be downhill until then.  I will never have to get off my duff to be creative again.  But you know what? … It is perfect reading and browsing for those of us with insomnia (or who can’t fall asleep at night because… well.. because our brains don’t shut off…).

(For those of you who are uninitiated, Pinterest is a visual version of adding bookmarks to your computer – but they remain online and accessible from wherever you have internet access.)

The truly addicting part for me, however, is NOT that I can bookmark my favorite things to do (a bucket list of crafts is what I’m accruing there) and/or teaching ideas (of which there is plethora of great ones, for those of you who teach) but several of my friends whose boards (bookmarks) I can “follow” (much like twitter or Facebook) are pinning some amazing looking food from bloggers.  And OH MY – the lemon bread?  Yes!  It was easy to convert to gluten free so it started the ball.

Lately, I’ve been seeing a lot of “pins” (as they are called) for pull-apart breads.  Exactly like a Monkey Bread (I have an early (2007) gluten free recipe for a monkey bread here).  The difference is mainly that pull-apart breads seem to be savory rather than sweet (although I recently made one to taste like lemonade for the girls – OH MY – do that again soon!).  I knew with my previous monkey bread experience that this was totally do-able, meaning: easy for me to convert to gluten free!

The recipe below we have used for the following flavors of Pull-Apart breads and is truly only limited by your own imagination and taste buds:

Garlic and Parmesan (was a great accompaniment to our pasta: recipe below)
Lemonade (fresh lemon, lemon juice and drizzled with grated candied lemon peel and icing)
Turkey & Cheese stuffed pull Aparts (topped with garlic and parmesan)
Pepperoni Pizza Pull Aparts (stuffed with pepperoni slices and cheese, topped with pizza sauce and more cheese)
Dill and Feta Pull Aparts (added tons of dill and a bit of feta to the dough, topped with garlic and drizzled with butter)
etc….

Pepperoni-Stuffed Pizza Pull Aparts (Kid-Created:  They made the dough, I stuffed, the topped)
Cheesy gluten free pull apart pizza bread
You see the drift here:  Basically whatever you want.  I can’t wait to see what you guys will do with this.  Please be sure to come back and inspire me too!  Let me know what you make.  Everyone can use the kitchen-inspiration.  :D

Gluten Free Garlic & Parmesan Pull Apart Bread

Makes one standard pie-plate of pull apart bread (about 12 balls that are 2 inches in diameter or so).  Download/Print a PDF copy of this recipe here.

Basic Recipe Ingredients:

1 cup warm milk (or water or soy milk or rice milk), between 110*-115*F
1 Tablespoon yeast
1 Tablespoon honey
4 Tablespoons melted butter (for dough) + more (for rolling dough balls in)
1 egg
2 1/4 cups Gluten Free Flour Mix (70% whole grain/30% starch)
2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt

For Garlic-Parmesan Pull-Aparts Add:

1 1/2 teaspoons granulated garlic
1/2 cup shredded parmesan

Directions:

  1. Flip your pie plate upside down onto a piece of parchment paper.  Trace the outer edge.  Cut the parchment to fit your tracing.  Flip your pie plate right side up.  Lightly butter the inside bottom of your pie plate (to help the parchment stay in place).  Press the now circle-shaped parchment into the pie plate.  The edges will wrinkle up a bit, but they will make it so much easier to get the pull apart out of the pan when you are done.
  2. Preheat your oven to 375F.
  3. Mix together your warm milk (110*-115*F), yeast and honey.  Set aside to proof.
  4. In the bowl of your mix, blend your dry ingredients:  GF Flour mix, xanthan gum, baking powder and salt.  If you are making the garlic parmesan version, add the granulated garlic now.
  5. Add your wet ingredients:  egg, melted butter and proofing mixture (it should have foamed up by now) of milk/honey/yeast.
  6. Mix on low until blended.  Then turn mixer up a little faster (#4 on my KitchenAid is our standard with little people helping) and mix for an additional 2-4 minutes.  This is what your dough will look like.

The dough and waiting pan

  1. Melt a couple of Tablespoons of butter into a cereal bowl.
  2. Divide your dough into 12 balls (about 2-2 1/2 inches in diameter).  Roll each in the melted butter than place into your parchment lined pie dish.  Continue until all the balls are coated and placed into the pan.  Sprinkle with parmesan cheese.
  3. Bake at 375 for 20-25 minutes until the crust of the balls are golden brown and the internal temperature registers between 195-204*F.   (See the picture above)
  4. Serve warm with an appropriate dipping sauce (if you’d like).  We ate these like garlic bread (the garlic-parmesan, obviously) while our kids liked dipping them into pizza sauce and/or their favorite dipping sauce.

Gluten free pull apart garlic bread - one piece, split

Enjoy!
Kate

Gluten Free Basic White Cake

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Gluten Free Ratio Rally

Baking with a cause: YOU and getting you back in the kitchen too!

I’ve written this post a million times over since I decided to host this month’s Gluten Free Ratio Rally.  Way back in the beginning, I signed up for this with high hopes – and I was being completely selfish when I chose the task:  cakes.  And white/yellow cakes.  (Sorry, chocolate cake fans..although a few bloggers appealed to you, I was really on the hunt for fabulous GF white cakes.)

I say selfishly because I do have some fabulous cake recipes.  My favorites are my sponge cake recipe and the mini-vanilla filled cupcakes.  But really, I have been longing for layer cakes due to their versatility.  My favorite cakes have always been white layer cakes.  It’s true!  Even since I started making cakes in our house when I was in elementary school. (I did a fine job of both trashing the kitchen and baking a decent cake.)  My favorite white cake recipe is still being worked on to convert it to gluten free.  I needed some help.  And some inspiration.

And (I hoped)  I can’t be the only one with an aversion to chocolate cakes. (Right??)

And I say that reluctantly because I know that some very fabulous people in my life have made some incredible flourless chocolate cakes for me (birthdays at work, etc).  I’ve eaten each slice with a smile.  But I have a confession to make:  I’ve never liked chocolate cakes.  At the age of six, I completely overindulged:  chocolate cake + chocolate ice cream + first day in new state/neighborhood/house = bad news for the future of chocolate cake in my life.  I am refraining from using details here … after all, this *IS* supposed to be a food blog.

So you see, I am selfish in my quest for the *perfect* gluten free non-chocolate cake.  I’m not the only one who realizes the beauty of a white cake – the versatility, etc.  Oh yes. A white cake is where it is at, people!  And you will see from this month’s ratio posters just how fabulously versatile it is!

I fell on a sword this month taste-testing over 9 cake recipes ideas in four weeks.  Not too pointy of a sword, mind you.  If the cake tasted great, but failed?  I have crumbled them into a baggie and made some “cake pops” for my daughter(s) and I.  We share one “cake pop” after swim lessons.  But I think I’m going to have to invest in some swim time for myself after a month of cake eating.  Ay ay ay!

I’ve discovered a few things about cake baking – especially gluten free cake baking – that I’d taken for granted previously.

  1. Watch your baking time CAREFULLY and check often – especially within the last 5-6 minutes.  An over baked gluten free cake = the Sahara Desert in your mouth.
  2. Have your eggs and butter at room temperature.  But don’t do this if you live without air-conditioning and your house is 80F.  Not cool.
  3. Add your eggs one by one and beat them in for a couple of minutes before adding the next.  (No matter how hard your child pulls on your legs/hands.  Add the eggs one at a time!)
  4. Parchment lined/bottomed cake pans are just as fabulous as dusting them with gluten free flour – and easier for me.
  5. Gluten free cake batter is definitely thicker than gluten-filled cake batter.  Don’t stress when you see it.
And most importantly:  the RATIO makes a difference.  You really do have to measure the flours by weight if you are going to change up the flours you chose to use.  If you see a cake within the several that will be shared today as part of the rally, please do take the time to use the flours they chose to use.  For each of the cakes I made, I used 228g of flour.  Sometimes this was the equivalent of 1 cup of rice flour + 1/2 cup tapioca flour OR 1 cup of rice flour + 1/3 cup potato starch OR 1 cup millet flour + 1/2 cup + 2 Tablespoons sweet rice flour.  Yikes.
I wanted to make a cake that anyone could make with readily available flours that are relatively inexpensive as far as gluten free flours go.  I wanted it to be something your best friend could make for you or your mom or your colleague if they wished to.  So many times our diet is intimidating and expensive.  I just wanted to simplify it all.  (And I’m not going to tell you about my initial starts of using whole grains, less sugar, etc because <girl smacks self in head now> I was making a cake.  I gave myself permission not to think about applesauce in lieu of butter, etc.  I just wanted a cake.  And a good one at that.
I ended up with several.  From one recipe too.

GF Basic White Cake
The basic cake.  With only the primary frosting on.  I had intended to frost this further, but the Chicklet got a hold of the sprinkles and she went to town.  So, it stayed just like this:  minimal frosting and a fabulous crumb.
GF Basic White Cake with Raspberry Jam center

For these little cupcakes, we filled them with a dollop of raspberry jam – (and some with Nutella – YUM!).  No frosting was needed.

GF Basic White Cake with Strawberry Jam and Strawberry ButtercreamSimilar to the one above, filled with sliced strawberries and topped with fresh strawberry buttercream frosting.  All things pink are met with approval from the Chicklet.

The ratio for a basic cake is as follows:

1:1:1:1

Egg : Sugar : Flour : Butter

I’m not convinced that I’ve achieved the cake I dream of.  But, in looking at the titles of the cakes of my fellow GF Ratio Rally participants, I see that I have a fabulous future of cake testing ahead of me.  (Tiramisu! Confetti Cake! Lemon Tea Cake! – just to name a few!)  Maybe one of you will find a way to make it even more fabulous.  That is the beauty of being a gluten free community:  learning, sharing and growing together.

Basic Gluten Free White Cake

Ingredients:

  • 8 ounces – 1 cup (2 sticks) of butter, room temperature
  • 8 ounces – 1 cup (226 grams) sugar
  • 4 eggs + 1 yolk
  • 3/4 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 226 grams “My” gluten free flour mix, sifted (1 1/2 cups + 2 teaspoons)
  • OR 175 grams (1 scant cup) rice flour + 50 grams (1/3 cup) potato starch
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.  Line the bottom of two 8 inch cake rounds with parchment paper OR butter each and flour with rice flour (NOT the rice flour called for in the recipe – please use 1 Tablespoon or 2 in addition to that called for in the recipe).
  2. Beat butter in the mixer until light and creamy.
  3. Add sugar.  Beat again for several minutes (3-4) on medium until light and fluffy.
  4. Add one egg.  Beat for 2 minutes.  Add next egg and beat again 2 more minutes.  Repeat until all eggs have been incorporated thoroughly.
  5. Add extracts.  Mix in.
  6. Sift together flour(s), baking powder and salt.  Add to cake batter.  Mix in carefully so as not to lose the softness created from mixing in the eggs/sugar.
  7. Divide into cake rounds evenly.  Smooth the surface with a wet spatula.  (I found it helpful to have a glass of water nearby and I kept dipping the rubber spatula into the water to keep the batter from sticking.)
  8. Bake until the top is just golden brown and a toothpick (or cake tester) inserted comes out shiny but not sticky – about 18-20 minutes.  Check your cake as you approach the 15 minute mark at a minimum to avoid over-baking.
  9. Remove from pans by flipping on to cooling racks after removing from the oven.  Allow to cool completely before frosting.
If you want to, this recipe easily converts in to cupcakes.  Bake for 15 – 18 minutes for 12 cupcakes.  When making cupcakes, we loved adding dollops of goodness (homemade raspberry or strawberry jams, Nutella, etc) in to the center of each cupcake and then we topped them with more batter.  These additions also added moisture to the cakes as well and helped them last longer. (Well, as long as a cupcakes can last around kids.)

Please check out the other fabulous Gluten Free Ratio Rally participants and their cakes, I know I will be doing taste-tests frequently from their ideas.  In fact, my sister-in-law is coming this week for a visit… so we have another birthday cake to make.  (Great excuse, huh?)

CSA Week 2: Radish Cakes

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GF Radish CakesGluten Free Savory Radish Cakes photo by Kate Chan

A couple weeks ago, we opened our first CSA box with joy and glee.  Zoe flipped the top open with a giggle.  ”It’s like Christmas, Momma!” she exclaimed.  Ha!  In my mind, I was thinking “Thank God Christmas doesn’t come with radishes!”  (I’m going to regret posting this thought as I’m sure someone will find it fun to gift some radishes to me.  Alas the joke will be on them.  My baby and I love them now!)

We started the first week with radishes.  We roasted them.  And yes, they are good roasted.  Even the carnivore in the house helped polish off the small bowl of roasted radishes.  But, I think he thought that would be it.

HA!  Week #2 CSA box:  more radishes.  In fact, this is what we got:

  • radishes
  • collard greens (recipe for this below as well)
  • scallions
  • spinach
  • red butterhead lettuce
  • green butterhead lettuce
  • mixed salad greens
  • broccoli

Most of the veggies easily fit in to our regular veg-habits.  True, we are eating more salad greens – but using them mostly as wraps for grilled meats or sandwiches.  I think we’ve only had two salads in the last two weeks “because we had to eat the veggies”.  Rather,  we are incorporating the veggies into our regular routine.  I mean really?  We eat a ton of stir fry and fresh fruit/veg.  So adding spinach?  Done.  We would have bought it weekly at the grocer too.  So from that above list only two were things we would not have picked up at the grocer:  radishes (still not super fans here) and collard greens (not always in our stores).

So those are the two things I chose to tackle.  First:  collard greens.  My love enjoys collard greens southern style.  I’ve enjoyed them as well.  But prepping them myself?  Nope.  No experience.

The greens were tender and I used one as a wrap for a sandwich.  It was good, but I knew I wouldn’t eat them all like there.  And there weren’t enough to make in the style my husband wanted.  (The beauty of the CSA is that there isn’t so much as to intimidate and just enough to encourage us to try it all.)

So, I made Collard Green Chips.  Yes.  The same thing that people are making with Kale.  The same kind of dried chip that we love (especially the seasoned lavar with sesame oil and salt – YUM!).   For the collard chips, I did the following:

  • wash the greens, trim the stalk and cut into chunks (fourths, in my case)
  • massage greens with sesame oil and salt for a few minutes – be sure to cover every piece evenly.
  • lay out on parchment or a silpat, put into a 350F oven, bake until crisp 6-8 minutes

I loved eating the chips plain.  So did the baby.  But really, my favorite was crumbling the chips over the top of some scrambled eggs or some brown rice at dinner time.  I loved the flavor it added without being overpowering that way.

But those pesky radishes.  Surely I wouldn’t have to roast more, right?  I didn’t want to spend my summer roasting veggies.  I have a few in the fridge from this week that I plan to figure out with the gas grill outside.  (I have a rockin’ recipe for a grilled potato salad that I think would benefit from some grilled radish.)

Anticipating more radishes from the CSA, I began to plan.  I made several batches of these savory radish cakes and to be honest, they became quite addictive.  The baby demolished them for breakfast one day and lunch the next (much to my mother’s dismay).

I have to beg your forgiveness though.  For once, I am posting my estimates and guesses at what would be the final recipe.  I altered it some many times and stopped taking notes at some point along the way because it got to be too much to manage:  the cooking, the baby who wanted it ASAP, the toddler who wanted to help cook, the final exams to be written and graded, etc.  It was just all too much.

Thankfully, summer has started.  Grades are in.  Classroom is cleaned up. And life is beginning again.  I’m trying out my mommy wings again and enjoying it.  Swimming lessons, slurping strawberries, painting fingernails, and planning naps.  NAPS!  Life is good when everyone naps, huh?

Anyway.  Stopping the yammering.  Posting the recipe.  Just know:  You’ve been warned.  It’s rough.  BUT DANG.  It’s good!

Savory Radish Cakes – gluten free

1 recipe makes 12 – 18 cakes

Ingredients:
3-4 medium radishes (4.5 ounces), shredded
salt
1/2 cup millet flour (88g/3 ounces)
1/2 cup tapioca starch flour (68g/2.5 ounces)
1/3 cup sweet rice flour (45g/2 ounces)
1 smidge of xanthan gum – 1/3 teaspoon??? (can be omitted)
1 – 2 cups hot water (I’m totally guessing on the water, can you tell?)
1 teaspoon (??) salt
1 teaspoon (??) garlic powder
3/4 teaspoon (??) cracked black pepper
2 teaspoons sesame oil
oil for pan frying (olive oil or sesame)

Directions:

  1. Shred radishes (go food processor!), toss with salt generously, and put into a colander over a bowl to catch liquid.  Set aside.
  2. Mix together flour, starches, smidge of xanthan gum (if using), salt, garlic powder, and cracked black pepper.  (I used my food processor to do this because it was easy to rinse out after shredding the radishes.  Heck.  One piece of kitchen gadgetry per recipe is my goal.)
  3. In a separate container (or 2 cup measuring cup), heat 1 cup of water (not boiling – but hot like a cup of tea).  Add sesame oil.  Turn on the food processor and slowly pour the water into the flour mix.   You want the mixture to have the same consistency as pancake batter eventually. So, start with one cup of water.  Don’t add any more just yet.
  4. Go back to your salted, shredded radishes.  Squeeze out as much water as you can from them.  Toss them into your batter.  Whirl the food processor again.
  5. Now check your consistency.  It should be a thick pancake batter (almost like for waffles).  If not, add more hot water slowly until you reach that desired thickness.  It should slowly, thickly slide off a spoon but be thicker than cake batter and not drip off the spoon.
  6. Pan fry the cakes in oil.  Sprinkle the cakes with a bit of salt while frying.
  7. Serve when warm with Soy-Ginger dipping sauce.  (Recipe below)

Soy-Ginger Dipping Sauce
1/2 cup soy sauce
2 Tablespoons vinegar
1 inch piece of fresh ginger, finely minced
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
scallions, optional

  1. Put all together in a small jar and shake well.  Set aside.
  2. Refrigerate any unused portion and use within a few days.

 

Really…this recipe is worth a try.  I’m sorry for the guess with the water.  But …bah… it is what it is.

And one last radish tip:  Shaved radishes + cucumbers make an AWESOME Thai salad. :)  I shaved my remaining radishes, seeded and peeled two English cucumbers and chopped the cukes into small pieces.  Then I mixed together 1/3 cup rice vinegar, 1/4 cup sugar, and 2 Tablespoons lemon juice.  OH MAN.  PERFECT summer treat.  (Yes, it makes a lot of liquid, but hey…that’s how I like my Thai Cucumber salad.)

Enjoy!
Kate